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Mrs. KVP is a 40-year-old woman in excellent health who developed hepatitis C from a blood transfusion following surgery. Her family doctor sent her to a liver expert who told her that she was seriously ill and must be treated immediately with interferon and ribaviron. KVP had no complaints and had heard that the standard treatment often made people much sicker than doing nothing.

KVP presented to my office, and her blood tests were all normal, except her ALT liver enzyme was elevated at about 300 mg/dL. This indicated that there was viral activity and inflammation in her liver. KVP's original laboratory tests and her progress after being treated with my triple antioxidant therapy over three years are demonstrated in figures (41KB .pdf)

After three years, she once again visited her hepatologist who told her that actually that she was getting sicker because her viral load had increased dramatically (Figure 12 in above .pdf). Again, he said that she should be put on interferon and ribaviron and be evaluated for a liver transplant. Incidentally, she had great health insurance.

Mrs. KVP is a health professional and questioned her hepatologist. She asked him if the original viral load was acceptable. He said, yes, however, it had increased from 600,000 to 6,000,000 units, and that showed progression of her disease. She asked him if he knew that the first viral load tests were done by the Chiron method and the second tests were done by the Quantasure method. He did not know that. Then, she told him that viral load is an artificial exaggeration (amplification) of the amount of viruses by millions, and the Quantasure method appears to amplify the amount of viruses by ten times more than the Chiron method. After hearing this reasonable explanation, he answered that viral load was not a very important test anyway.

The three people described in this study continued to stay on the triple antioxidant therapy, and I still see two of them as patients today (Fall 2007). The two continue to improve. In addition to ALA, I added silymarin and selenium to my triple antioxidant therapy, because these agents also protect the liver from free radical damage, regenerate the other fundamental antioxidants, and interfere with viral replication. Although my first acute hepatic necrosis patients were treated with ALA alone and did exceedingly well, all the patients presented in this paper followed the triple antioxidant program and recovered quickly from their illness.

The standard-of-care treatments for severe liver damage, especially liver transplant surgery, can be painful, disabling, and extremely costly. From my experience in my practice, interferon and antivirals have less than a 30% improvement rate, and this response is usually not permanent. Liver transplant surgery in a few cases can be lifesaving and necessary, but is uncertain and tentative, partly due to the residual viremia that ultimately infects the newly transplanted liver. I have found that the highest viral loads are seen following liver transplant surgery, since the residual viruses in the bloodstream and tissues have a new healthy liver on which to feed.

The triple antioxidant therapy offers a more conservative approach to the treatment of hepatitis C that is much less expensive. One year of antioxidant therapies described in this paper costs only a few thousand dollars, whereas liver transplant surgery costs more than $400,000 a year, and in five years, the person will probably require a new transplant. And, in addition, the transplant patient will require anti-rejection drugs and many doctor and hospital visits. It appears reasonable to me that prior to transplant evaluation or during the transplant evaluation process, this conservative triple antioxidant treatment program should be considered. If there is a significant improvement in the patient's condition, liver transplant surgery may be avoided.

Not too long ago, I was invited by the Internal Medicine Society of Saxony to present my triple antioxidant protocol to the group in Dresden, Germany. I was asked why viral loads did not always fall to very low levels with my treatment program. I answered that from a microbiologist's point of view that I did not believe that one could ever completely eradicate a viral disease without killing the patient. I added that we could only hope to support and "teach" the immune system how to recognize and control a virus. Normally, viruses remain part of our biology for the rest of our lives. And this does not necessarily make a person sick. We are all filled with billions of dormant viruses. As long as we have a healthy lifestyle and avoid unnecessary emotional and physical stress, the viruses should remain dormant. I believe that one can live to 100 years old with hepatitis C and still be a healthy person.

The purpose of HIV is to weaken and destroy the normal functions of the human immune system.

The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body. One of the important cells involved are white blood cells, also called leukocytes, which come in two basic types that combine to seek out and destroy disease-causing organisms or substances.


Discuss physiological, psychological and social aspects …

There is an increasedcumulative effect of DNA mutation and a decline in immune-systemfunction with age.

The presence of opioid peptides and opiate receptors in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system, as well as the inhibitory effects of enkephalins and beta-endorphin on release of oxytocin and vasopressin has been well documented . Opioid peptides inhibit oxytocin release and thereby promote the preferential secretion of vasopressin when it is of functional importance to maintain homeostasis during dehydration and hemorrhage. Both neuromodulators and a neurohormones co-exist in the same neuron, as demonstrated for vasopressin with dynorphin or leucine-enkephalin, which serves to regulate the differential release of two biologically different, yet evolutionarily-related, neurohormones, e.g. oxytocin and vasopressin, from the same neuroendocrine system.