Man is explicable bynothing less than all his history.



Nature is full of a sublime family likeness throughout herworks; and delights in startling us with resemblances in the mostunexpected quarters.

There were twelve essays inthis volume the very first being one entitled

"The Idea of Folklore: An Essay," in Issachar Ben-Ami and Joseph Dan, eds. Folklore Research Center Studies VII. Jerusalem: The Magnes Press, 1983, pp. 11-17.


CollingwoodHistorian ~ Idea of History page

Buddhism as practiced in Japan and China also granted women some areas of empowerment. Women went on pilgrimages to Buddhist temples, retreated to nunneries, sometimes gave public lectures, and led temple groups. Chinese Buddhism was at its height during the reign of Wu Zetian who promoted the religion and even justified her rule by claiming she was a reincarnation of a previous female Buddhist saint. During Wu’s reign, and throughout the early to mid Tang period, women enjoyed relatively high status and freedom. Lovely Tang era paintings and statues depict women on horseback, and as administrators, dancers and musicians. Stories and poems, like those from the pen of the infamous female poet Yu Xuanji, also attest to the almost modern openness of the period.


Look into the history surrounding your family for a list of topics ..

In that sense, folklore withstands the test that language has failed. While modern discoveries about animals clearly demonstrate that some master the rudiments of language communication (e.g., whales sing), so far neither monkeys nor rats have been caught telling legends to their infants. But the universality of folklore is not confined to the formal basis alone. The themes, the metaphors, and the subjects of stories, songs, and sayings of peoples who live in countries remote from each other and who speak completely unrelated languages exhibit a high degree of similarity that history could not explain. Migrations, contacts in war and peace cannot account for the common features that the tales and poems of native Australians, Africans, and Americans share. All include stories of gods, of creation and of destruction; all tell about marvelous events, beings and places; and all dwell upon the supernatural, the extraordinary, the absolute, and the incongruous. Their metaphors relate to nature, beliefs, and societies, and their songs celebrate victories and lament failures in the struggle for survival Often, similarities are even more striking when the same narrative episodes and verbal or visual images appear in the expressions of unrelated peoples.

Expository Essay Topics: 50 Original Ideas and Prompts

According to the above premises, the mythology of all nations not only tells about but the dawn of humanity. It incarnates the commonality in all communities and voices the primordial expression of man. In its fundamental forms folklore emerged before human diversity developed and thus embodies the most rudimentary forms of verbal and visual symbols. The primariness of folklore has historical and evolutionary aspects. Historically, folklore allegedly dates to time immemorial, and, hence, at its original stage, preceded any known recorded history. When man hunted and gathered his food, or even when he began to farm the land and to herd his cattle, without quite mastering writing, he already narrated and sang tales and songs. The folklore of the world, it is hence assumed, abounds with symbols, themes, and metaphors that pertain to the beginning of human civilization and could shed light on the dark corners of history which no other document could illuminate. The forms of folklore are thus regarded as the cores at the hearts of artistic forms. They are the primitive, crude expressions out of which the literary, visual, and musical cultural heritage of the peoples of the world has emerged. Folklore comprises the symbolic forms at the base of the complex expressions of literate societies.

R. G. Collingwood Idea of History - Age of the Sage

So allthat is said of the wise man by Stoic, or oriental or modernessayist, describes to each reader his own idea, describes hisunattained but attainable self.