Jealousy can also be for someone's suspicions of unfaithfulness.

He was prejudice towards the African American, Othello, to whom he held a lower military position; a less qualified man, Cassio, was promoted as Othello's lieutenant, and he wasn't high in social classes....

Also, it is Iago's jealousy of Othello that drives him to destroy both Othello and Desdemona.

One is quick to think this jealously is based on Othello’s lack of belief in Desdemona’s faithfulness to him or his suspensions over Desdemona’s affair with Cassio, Othello’s honorable lieutenant.


Jealousy can also be overwhelming; by making one obsessed with ideas.

The theme of jealousy is demonstrated in the play by Iago and Othello....

In Hamlet and Macbeth the scene opens with superstition; but, in each it is not merely different, but opposite. In the first it is connected with the best and holiest feelings; in the second with the shadowy, turbulent, and unsanctified cravings of the individual will. Nor is the purpose the same; in the one the object is to excite, whilst in the other it is to mark a mind already excited. Superstition, of one sort or another, is natural to victorious generals; the instances are too notorious to need mentioning. There is so much of chance in warfare, and such vast events are connected with the acts of a single individual,—the representative, in truth, of the efforts of myriads, and yet to the public and, doubtless, to his own feelings, the aggregate of all,—that the proper temperament for generating or receiving superstitious impres-sions is naturally produced. Hope, the master element of a commanding genius, meeting with an active and combining intellect, and an imagination of just that degree of vividness which disquiets and impels the soul to try to realize its images, greatly increases the creative power of the mind; and hence the images become a satisfying world of themselves, as is the case in every poet and original philosopher:—but hope fully gratified, and yet, the ele-mentary basis of the passion remaining, becomes fear;
and, indeed, the general, who must often feel, even though he may hide it from his own consciousness, bow large a share chance had in his successes, may very naturally be irresolute in a new scene, where he knows that all will depend on his own act and election.


Shakespeare's Othello: Plot Summary

The paradigm of otherness presented in this play is more complicated than the conclusion, "Othello is different; therefore, he is bad." Othello's character is to be revered.

SparkNotes: Othello: Act III, scene iv

Throughout the play the reader witnesses many different personalities carried out by Othello, the most prominent being; doubtfulness, rationality, and his being a “jealous monster”.

A summary of Act III, scene iv in William Shakespeare's Othello

In Shakespeare's Othello the Moor of Venice, Othello is considered a tragic hero because he undergoes a Othello possesses both a noble birth and displays heroic qualities.

Iago Character Introduction - Shakespeare Online

A rather obvious theme in the Shakespeare's tragedy, "Othello", is that of the many facets of jealousy, which instigate the evil-doings of protagonist, Iago....

Othello Act I Summary and Analysis | GradeSaver

In this essay I will be discussing the reasons for and against Othello being responsible for his downfall through looking at critical interpretations of his character and actions.

No Fear Shakespeare: Othello: Act 4, Scene 3

Emilia is the lone character who garners the knowledge to all circumstances of the events surrounding the characters in Othello the Moor. Although other characters in the play are privy to certain details of the unfolding events, Emilia is the character that uses this knowledge to the benefit of the play. Emilia's character is minor yet necessary. Without her character the play would have no means of unraveling the c...