How To Respect Your Parents Essay - How To Respect Your Parents Essay

Hi Liz,
It would be great if you help me with the below query.
For the below type of essay:
Some people say that children should play games which require teamwork whereas some think they should be doing individual sports. Do you agree or disagree.

Self Respect Essay Example for Free

I just wrote the IELTs english test and used the paraphrasing technique in the Writing Task 2.
I substituted the word young children for youths in some parts of my essay. Now I am thinking about whether or not that was an appropriate choice and if not what are the consequences?


Respect For The Law - IVAN HOFFMAN

Free Essay On Respect In The Military - Free Essay On Respect In The Military

Hello Liz,
Thanks for the reply.
Took my IELTS few days ago. The Speaking section didn’t go well, I could speak for around 30 sec only for the cue card, apart from that the rest was ok. The LRW was good enough.
Your blog has been really helpful. For the writing task 2, the task was to discuss two views, and that was very similar to the model essay posted by you under the agree /disagree model answer.
How much will the cue card task affect my speaking scores?


How many paragraphs in an IELTS Writing Task 2 Essay

Your main ideas are not off topic at all. You’ve organised your ideas and paragraphs very well. But some of your supporting points might less focused. For example, in your first body paragraph you are absolutely right to write about children becoming self absorbed which could continue into their adult life. This is relevant because the essay question is about a society of individuals. But your point about parents not being able to control them is not on topic – this is not about parental control, it’s about selfishness. Even with minor points lacking a bit of focus, it is still possible to hit band 7 in Task Response.

Paragraphs are marked by the examiner in IELTS writing task 2

China could not now be described in any way as a liberal democracy. At present, no more than 20 percent of its economy has been marketized, and most importantly it continues to be ruled by a self-appointed Communist party which has given no hint of wanting to devolve power. Deng has made none of Gorbachev's promises regarding democratization of the political system and there is no Chinese equivalent of glasnost. The Chinese leadership has in fact been much more circumspect in criticizing Mao and Maoism than Gorbachev with respect to Brezhnev and Stalin, and the regime continues to pay lip service to Marxism-Leninism as its ideological underpinning. But anyone familiar with the outlook and behavior of the new technocratic elite now governing China knows that Marxism and ideological principle have become virtually irrelevant as guides to policy, and that bourgeois consumerism has a real meaning in that country for the first time since the revolution. The various slowdowns in the pace of reform, the campaigns against "spiritual pollution" and crackdowns on political dissent are more properly seen as tactical adjustments made in the process of managing what is an extraordinarily difficult political transition. By ducking the question of political reform while putting the economy on a new footing, Deng has managed to avoid the breakdown of authority that has accompanied Gorbachev's . Yet the pull of the liberal idea continues to be very strong as economic power devolves and the economy becomes more open to the outside world. There are currently over 20,000 Chinese students studying in the U.S. and other Western countries, almost all of them the children of the Chinese elite. It is hard to believe that when they return home to run the country they will be content for China to be the only country in Asia unaffected by the larger democratizing trend. The student demonstrations in Beijing that broke out first in December 1986 and recurred recently on the occasion of Hu Yao-bang's death were only the beginning of what will inevitably be mounting pressure for change in the political system as well.

The End of History? - Francis Fukuyama

I want to ask if I’m allowed to incorporate sayings or proverbs in my essay.
For example: “Obliging children to begin formal education earlier is no different from flogging the proverbial dead horse”.
Or: “As the saying goes: The devil makes work for idle hands”.