Essay on America Is a Melting Pot - 357 Words

If in the land of almost unlimited opportunity the melting pot process still continues, what, then, should be expected in other societies less individualistic and universal than the United States? The American experience remains the classic model for the melting pot, in the sense of a blending of discrete ethnic identities. This concept has been widely endorsed over the last century, even though it has been but partially realized. On the other hand, melting pot in the Zionist context has been an ethical and mythical expression of creating a national society evolving on its historical territory through the ingathering, as well as the integration of the "exiles." The contemporary adoption of the Biblical promise of the Return of the Exiles implied the construction of a new Jewish civilization through the establishment of a Jewish majority, the creation of a normal economy, and the revival of the Hebrew language. This concept won widespread approval in the Zionist movement and was the fundamental idea that...

America is a Melting Pot America has become a ..

Language is an expression of culture. There is in America a profound, underground culture, that of the unmeltable populations. Blacks have proven over the years. The only place allowed them near the melting pot was underneath it. Getting burned. Hispanics also were left out of


Melting pot salad bowl essay - …

This word accurately describes life in the United States of America much more than the word melting pot.

In fact, for some nationalistic Hispanic groups, bilingual education teaches English too well. Denouncing these programs as an effort to "angloize" our kids, nationalist radicals fear that through bilingual education Hispanics may lose their identity and get truly melted into the American pot. So bilingual education gets attacked from both sides: from flag-waving "America first" patriots and also from some militant Hispanics who cherish cultural pluralism.


6/18/2010 · A comeback for the American melting pot

This paper aims to study how Bharati Mukherjee has captured the chaos of the Melting Pot about the Indian immigrant experiences in America in her short stories and novels.

Free Essays on Race and Ethnicity in the Melting Pot

6.3 (2001) 54-70
At the start of the new millennium, the Jewish population in Israel numbered almost five million, the "optimal threshold" foreseen 60-70 years ago by three "utopian" visionaries: David Ben-Gurion, Ze'ev Jabotinsky, and Mordechai Bentov. This demographic revolution contains immense historical significance. It means that, in the Land of Israel, a new Jewish center has been established identical in size with that of pre-WWI Czarist Russia and greatly exceeding that of Poland between the two world wars. In many aspects the Israeli center differs from its earlier counterparts by its use of Hebrew, ethnic fabric, political status, socio-economic structure, and geographic location. It resembles the older Jewish European communities, however, in its national aspirations and even surpasses them in its historical significance. Sovereign Israel is a social reality in which Jews, for the first time since the sixth century a.d., have become a territorial majority in their ancestral homeland. This demographic phenomenon realized both a quantitative and qualitative ambition. The reconstitution of the Jewish people in their homeland raised questions of how the admixture of diverse immigrations would cohere and coalesce into one society. The operating metaphor often employed is borrowed from the American experience: the ideal of the melting pot. It is the purpose of this essay to explore the various nuances of how that idea was constructed by Zionist theoreticians and to what extent the melting pot was realized in Zionist experience. In pursuing this inquiry, the use of melting pot in the Zionist context calls for clarification of two sets of related terms. The first is the classic distinction between civilization, in the sense of a comprehensive realization of all political, material, and technological life; and the term culture, which embraces the multiplicity of ideas and values by which society lives and to which it adheres. Although this differentiation has lately come under criticism--and [End Page 54] in today's accepted parlance the term culture includes civilization--for our purposes, the traditional connotation will be employed. The second set of terms is "melting " as distinct from "melting " The distinction is that the is also the framework, but the is only a gauge for the degree of heat. An additional set of frequently used twin terms, the " of exiles" and the " of exiles," is linked to the previous terms in a double context. The of exiles is related to melting and civilization, while the of exiles and melting encompass both an ethical culture and a framework. The "melting pot" is best illustrated in the United States, the country where the term originated. The distinguished Israeli scholar, Yehoshua Arieli, claimed that the ideal of melting or uniting different people of diverse national backgrounds into a new nation is not a lightly-drawn metaphor. "This term has expressed, and still does, a concept accepted by the majority of Americans regarding the meaning of Americanization and the way a new nation and a new person () have been created." If in the land of almost unlimited opportunity the melting pot process still continues, what, then, should be expected in other societies less individualistic and universal than the United States? The American experience remains the classic model for the melting pot, in the sense of a blending of discrete ethnic identities. This concept has been widely endorsed over the last century, even though it has been but partially realized. On the other hand, melting pot in the Zionist context has been an ethical and mythical expression of creating a national society evolving on its historical territory through the ingathering, as well as the integration of the "exiles." The contemporary adoption of the Biblical promise of the Return of the Exiles implied the construction of a new Jewish civilization through the establishment of a Jewish majority, the creation of a normal economy, and the revival of the Hebrew language. This concept won widespread approval in the Zionist movement and was the fundamental idea that...

In the exploration of race and ethnicity in the melting pot, ..

This demographic phenomenon realized both a quantitative and qualitative ambition. The reconstitution of the Jewish people in their homeland raised questions of how the admixture of diverse immigrations would cohere and coalesce into one society. The operating metaphor often employed is borrowed from the American experience: the ideal of the melting pot. It is the purpose of this essay to explore the various nuances of how that idea was constructed by Zionist theoreticians and to what extent the melting pot was realized in Zionist experience. In pursuing this inquiry, the use of melting pot in the Zionist context calls for clarification of two sets of related terms. The first is the classic distinction between civilization, in the sense of a comprehensive realization of all political, material, and technological life; and the term culture, which embraces the multiplicity of ideas and values by which society lives and to which it adheres. Although this differentiation has lately come under criticism--and [End Page 54] in today's accepted parlance the term culture includes civilization--for our purposes, the traditional connotation will be employed.