Uc berkeley haas undergraduate application essays

Hamilton Morris’s situation seems to be that in college, he faces a choice of what to focus on as his ultimate goal. Since, as the article describes, he grew up sampling a kaleidoscope of hobbies and interests, Morris seems uncomfortable in the college environment of structured majors organized to progress toward a specific discipline. Students like Morris have been bombarded by pop culture their entire lives. It’s no wonder Morris found stand-up comedy, filmmaking, and photography stimulating. And although college isn’t all about the arts–many people go, unbeknownst to Rick Perlstein, apparently, to pursue more traditional vocations like medicine, law, or social work–this becomes less true statistically for U.S. students every day. Students like Morris, who lack interest in traditional college structure and real-world work, affect culture intensely. The lack of American students interested in mathematics and sciences has many far-reaching cultural effects. For example, the United States has seen an influx of foreign students who are studying these disciplines, and domestic companies often outsource engineering and technical positions to other countries more focused on such interests. So although Hamilton Morris may never take up renewable energy research as a political cause (as Perlstein would probably like), or even major in chemistry to pursue a solution to the same cause, his failure to act has just as significant an impact on culture.

Uc davis undergraduate application essays - …

The UCR English Department is committed to the study of English and American literatures and cultures. Our work is oriented by literature and by the question of the literary, even as it expands to consider a wide range of texts. Oral traditions, material objects, visual culture, performance art, and soundscapes figure in our scholarship alongside more traditional and other innovative forms. A broad and diverse understanding of English and American literature includes everything from medieval lyrics to film and digital media; from the plays of Shakespeare to the work of Louise Erdrich, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, and Toni Morrison; from poetry by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz to novels by Mary Shelley, James Joyce, or the poetry and prose of Cherrie Moraga or Gloria Anzaldúa. A wide range of critical formations shape our practice. To name only a few: archive studies; Asian American Studies; Black Studies; Feminist and Queer Studies; Hemispheric Studies; Latin@ Studies; Native and Indigenous Studies; Postcolonial Studies; SFTS (Science/Speculative Fiction and Technology Studies); and Transatlantic Studies. Literature, furthermore, is not only what we study: it is what we write. Our department has a history of supporting innovative critical practice across a range of formats, including experimental criticism, creative non-fiction, poetry and curatorial work. Both our undergraduate and graduate programs are structured around principles of justice and equality, and we pride ourselves that our own innovative research demonstrates these principles, as does our commitment to imaginative pedagogy. We take the meaning of instruction and mentorship seriously: the integrity of the faculty-student relationship is at the heart of our work. We show our broad range of interests and rich research profile in everything we do, and we share those interests with our students. Our teaching anchors our scholarship. As a department, we are committed to valuing the ways that teaching, service and scholarship inform and support each other.


Uc davis undergraduate application essays

Uc berkeley undergraduate application essay - …

In my own experience, I find that college today has become a business, and a highly profitable one at that. Beginning in high school, the average student pays to take the standardized tests required by admissions, if not classes and books to prepare. Then come the onslaught of application fees, entrance fees and tuition, which even at state schools continues to rise higher and higher. And finally, there is the price of books, which in and of itself smacks of racketeering. As a student, I was relieved when my textbooks were only $300 per quarter, and lucky when I was able to sell them back for a quarter of their original worth. Imagine my surprise when I went to the bookstore and was told that my books had no value. How could a book have no value?